Archive for the ‘Family Philanthropy’ Category

Relative Values: A conversation on philanthropy across generations

March 22, 2013

Last week, the Institute and Barclays hosted an exclusive event in central London on the topic of family philanthropy. Three prominent philanthropists – Hannah Rothschild of the Rothschild Foundation, Anna Southall of the Barrow Cadbury Trust and Katherine Lorenz of The Cynthia and George Mitchell Foundation – formed a panel, facilitated by Mary Glanville, Managing Director UK of the Institute and introduced by Emma Turner, Director of Client Philanthropy Service at Barclays Wealth and Investment Management, to discuss their personal experiences of giving with an audience of over forty philanthropists.

At the Institute, we regularly consider the issues around next generation philanthropy – both in our education courses for donors as well as in our knowledge development programme – and we appreciate the unique challenges and opportunities that arise when giving as a family. As one panellist said, “family philanthropy can be very difficult – it can sometimes feel as though you have to choose between social impact and your relationship with your family”. Mary facilitated an informative and lively discussion between the panellists, who spoke frankly about their own experiences and in so doing provided practical advice to our audience. Here are some highlights of their discussion:

  • Getting involved in your family’s philanthropy can serve not only to develop understanding of best practice in philanthropy, but can also assist your professional career. One panellist explained that her experience of being a trustee at a young age gave her invaluable knowledge of governance which she used very successfully in her independent career. The knowledge transfer has worked both ways for each of our panellists as expertise gained in their respective careers has also given added dimension to their family’s giving.
  • It’s helpful to encourage the next generation to get involved in philanthropic activity at a very early age – perhaps by ring-fencing small sums of money and asking them to choose how to give it, or getting them to do a pitch on behalf of their chosen charity to the trustees of the foundation.
  • Recruiting trustees and staff members who are not members of your own family can be pivotal in bringing balance in structures dominated by family dynamics, as well as a different perspective to board discussions. You can also gain valuable issue-area expertise that members of your family may not already bring to the table.
  • Recognising the value of your name may enable you to use all of your assets for good; one of our speakers’ trusts took a strategic decision to allow grantees to say that they had received philanthropic money from them as they saw that it helped the groups they support to leverage other funding and strengthen their advocacy initiatives.
  • Think about the future of your family’s trust: consider setting a strategy that means the trust isn’t restricted to funding very specific issues in the future if they are no longer relevant. This may allow each generation to shape the focus of the trust and to ensure that its work is always appropriate for current needs.

The Institute for Philanthropy will be running a two-day education course for next generation philanthropists in London in June. For more information about this course, or any of our other donor education programmes, please contact the The Philanthropy Workshop team on: tpw@instituteforphilanthropy.org

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Family philanthropy event with Barclays Wealth and Investment Management – summary coming soon!

March 14, 2013

The Institute for Philanthropy and Barclays Wealth and Investment Management last night hosted a conversation with three prominent philanthropists at an exclusive event focused on family philanthropy. We were delighted to welcome guests from a wide range of different geographies and philanthropic perspectives to hear what was a lively and informative discussion from the panel. Keep an eye on our blog next week for a summary of the discussions!

A response to the Giving Pledge announcement

February 19, 2013

The Giving Pledge is the most high profile public campaign promoting philanthropy among the wealthy. A unique, international survey of high net worth individuals has been conducted by the Institute for Philanthropy which reveals the attitudes of philanthropists to the Giving Pledge.

The majority of respondents (68.4%) estimate that they will give up to 50% of their wealth in their lifetimes. Of the 26.3% of respondents who estimated that they will give at least 50% of their wealth in their lifetimes less than half (four of ten) have signed up to the Giving Pledge or adopted its principles.  Two people (5%) did not respond to this question. 18.42% estimate they will give between 51-75% of wealth; 7.9% estimate they will give over 76% of wealth.  Furthermore, the majority have already decided the way in which they will carry out their giving (in their lifetimes, or through a vehicle after their death, for example).

David Sainsbury, one of the new Giving Pledge signatories announced today, explains his motivations for philanthropy: “A number of years ago my wife, Susie, and I decided that spending any more money on ourselves or our family would not add anything to our happiness, but that using it to support social progress was something that we both found deeply fulfilling. We, therefore, decided to transfer gradually most of our wealth to our charitable trusts, and looking back that has turned out to be a very life-enhancing decision.”

The motive for the four philanthropists who completed the survey and who have signed up to the Giving Pledge or have adopted principles is “Wish to devote the majority of wealth to good causes”, not “Wish to encourage other people to become more involved in philanthropy” or “Belief that wealth is a burden on future generations”.

Interestingly, our results indicate that the number of philanthropists who have already made the decision to commit the majority of their wealth to good causes is potentially much greater than the Giving Pledge campaign implies.

This could be due to a low level of knowledge of the Pledge among philanthropists (just over half of the respondents had heard of the Giving Pledge and knew what it consisted of (55.2%) and of those who have not heard of the Giving Pledge, half are in the UK (four people) and half in North America (three from the US and one from Canada)).

There are however other factors beyond a lack of knowledge: our survey found that the most common consideration behind not signing the Pledge or adopting principles is a desire to remain private. The second most popular consideration was a wish to pass wealth to future generations.

NOTES:

  • Respondents came from seven different countries, the UK (39.5%) and US (36.8%) were the most common geographies, however we also had respondents from Canada, Mexico, Netherlands, Finland and Italy.
  • The average annual giving of respondents is $1,532,941 (result possibly skewed by two donors who are giving away very large sums of money). One third of respondents are giving away at least $1m annually.
  • Of those who have signed up or have adopted the principles of the Giving Pledge, these people are giving away at least $1m philanthropically a year
  • The timeframe in which giving will take place is fairly mixed: 26.3% said the majority of giving would be carried out during the philanthropists lifetime, 31.5% said that there would be a vehicle for philanthropy after their death, and 29% said that they had not decided yet.
  • The majority of respondents reported they believed that the Giving Pledge would result in an increase in philanthropic money (71%).
  • Many respondents expressed the belief that the role of philanthropy was not just to “throw money at problems”; rather it should be well-researched, thought through and strategically deployed for impact. As one donor said of the Giving Pledge: “money shouldn’t be the only thing acknowledged”.
  • The survey was distributed throughout an influential network of philanthropists, many of whom have graduated from The Philanthropy Workshop (TPW) programme which educates major donors in the skills of strategic philanthropy.
  • 38 people responded to the survey

www.instituteforphilanthropy.org

For more information please contact:

Daisy Wakefield,

daisy@instituteforphilanthropy.org

+44 (0) 207 2400626

The future of philanthropy: collaboration and partnerships are increasingly important

February 6, 2013

A growing trend, identified in the annual Family Foundation Giving Trends (PDF) report released in December 2012, is an increase in existing and proposed strategic collaboration and financial partnerships among donors. This is a trend that we have seen grow within our own influential network of philanthropists, many of whom have graduated from The Philanthropy Workshop (TPW) programme which educates major donors in the skills of strategic philanthropy.

These partnerships go beyond “traditional” giving circles and co-funding opportunities. The Indigo Trust funds technology driven projects primarily in Africa, but also uses social and digital media to connect with other funders and share insight. The fundraising community can benefit greatly from the expanded use of social media by donors, gaining a valuable insight into their activities and requirements. The Oak Foundation, which is led by TPW alumnus Dr. Kristian Parker, has taken part in large-scale collaborations with other donors in order to leverage resources, for example to create an institution or fill a gap in infrastructure.

While collaboration and partnership are not new concepts, they are becoming an increasingly important part of the way in which philanthropists work. Facilitated by new technologies, partnerships formed for a range of objectives are set to become commonplace among philanthropists wishing to maximise the impact of their work.

By Mary Glanville, Managing Director of the Institute for Philanthropy in the UK.

This post first appeared in the January – March 2013 edition of Bond‘s “The Networker” magazine. Please click here to read the full magazine (PDF). 

Philanthropy Lesson #002: “Pass It On”

August 4, 2010

Many philanthropists, when speaking of the motivations behind their giving, talk of a desire to give something back to the community that has given them so much.  We applaud that aim; at the same time, it’s never too early to start thinking about changing the world around you for the better.  With that in mind, we’ve prepared Tomorrow’s Donors; a paper examining how family philanthropy can be a powerful tool for good, as the older generations pass down their learning to the younger ones – and learn from the younger ones in the process.  The paper features six case studies with families of donors with whom we have worked, as well as ten tips for philanthropic families as they go about their giving.